Make space for a magic mail center, an easy way to make kindness a regular part of family life. From

Make Space for a Magic Mail Center

A simple addition to any family routine.

Children love sharing their art and love through the mail, almost as much as they love receiving it. This everyday act of kindness will spread smiles far and wide.


Possible Recipients

Your options are limitless! Use our printable address sheet to help get started, but soon your family will be adding address to the list based on people you feel need a smile. If you would like specific address for children in the hospital, including birth dates and personal stories to inspire your letters, visit Send Kids the World.

What You'll Need

  • A convenient space to store your materials
  • Blank cards, postcards, and/or stationery
  • Envelopes
  • Stickers, temporary tattoos, and other inexpensive, mailable goodies
  • Pens, pencils, crayons, & markers
  • Stamps
  • Sturdy rope or twine, tacks, clothes pins (optional)
  • Our printable address template


  1. Print our address template and add address of your choice to the blank spaces.
  2. Select a space for your mail center. Consider using two tacks to hang a length of twine along an unused hallway wall. Using clothes pins, you can attach your addresses, along with stamps, stickers, and drawings waiting for a home.
  3. Gather other materials in an easy to reach box or drawer.
  4. Watch for down time, when your child(ren) are in the mood to draw or write. Suggest sending their creations to one of your addresses.
  5. Deliver your mail in a big blue mail box or at the post office, together if possible.


  • What was the last fun piece of mail you remember receiving? Who was it from? How did it make you feel?
  • Have you ever been sick in bed for more than a day or two? Were you lonely?
  • Can you imagine how you might feel if you couldn't easily leave your home for weeks or months?
  • Make a list of the different people (friends you know, people you've heard about in the news, or simply people in different scenarios) who may benefit from a thoughtful piece of mail.


  • The Giant Hug by Sandra Horning. Follow a hug on its heart-warming adventure through the postal system all the way to Granny’s house. Then send some hugs of your very own to folks who could use some extra attention.

  • Ordinary Mary’s Extraordinary Deed, by Emily Pearson. Introduce the idea that kindness is contagious, and watch kindness circle the globe in just a few days. Mary, as ordinary as any other kid, starts it all with a special delivery. The rhythm and rhyme of this book make it a fun read aloud experience, too.

  • Older children might enjoy reading Same Sun Here by Silas House and Neela Vaswani. This extraordinary story, told entirely in letters between arecent immigrant from India and a Kentucky coal miner's son, helps readers understand empathy across wide gaps in experience. Plus it makes a powerful case for the potential impact of snail mail correspondence.

Take it Further

  • Does your family enjoy sending meaningful notes and drawings to people who may be lonely? Consider connecting in person with lonely seniors. Simply follow our Visit the Elderly project instructions.
  • Create a “mail journal” with notes, photos of drawingsyour child was particularly proud of, and other mementos about the mail you send, as well as any return mail you might receive.

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