Help kids experience the deliciousness of diversity with this simple illustration and scrambled egg experiment.

Good Eggs

Celebrate diversity over breakfast.

Help kids experience the deliciousness of diversity with this simple illustration and scrambled egg experiment.


What you’ll need

  • 6 Brown eggs
  • 6 White eggs
  • Paper and pencils
  • 1/3 cup milk
  • Cheese
  • Salt, pepper

Instructions

  • Give each family member a white egg and a brown egg.
  • Invite everyone to gently examine each egg and share their observations,
    • How are the eggs similar?
    • How are they different?
  • Record everyone’s observations. Then invite everyone to state their hypothesis, or guess, about what is on the inside of the egg. Record those as well.
    • Will the eggs be the same or different on the inside?
  • Crack the white eggs into one bowl and the brown eggs into another.
  • Compare what you find and record those observations?
  • Are you ready to taste the differences and similarities? Make and record one last hypothesis:
    • Will the eggs taste the same or different?
  • Help your kids turn each set of eggs into scrambled eggs with the following recipe:
    • 2 tbs butter
    • 6 eggs
    • 1/3 cup milk
    • Salt, pepper to taste
    • Shredded cheese to taste
    • Melt butter in the pan over low heat. Whisk together eggs , milk, salt and pepper. Add to frying pan and cook, stirring often, until eggs are slightly firm. Add cheese until melted. Enjoy.
  • Continue your conversation during the taste test, writing down your final observations.
    • How are the eggs similar and different, inside and out?

Reflections

  • Were you surprised by the results?
  • How are people similar to the eggs?
  • What makes the members of your family the same?
  • What makes you each different?
  • What does this teach you about other people?

Resources

  • Whoever You Are by Mem Fox (Sandpiper, 2006). Ages 4 and up. This beautiful, poetic book assures our little ones that wherever they are, whoever they are, and however they live, all people share the same feelings on the inside.
  • Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman (Dial, 1991). Ages 4 and up. One creative, beautiful little girl overcomes the judgments of others and shows her classmates what a star she can be.

Take it further

  • What are some other food that looked different or strange on the outside, but surprise us by being wonderful on the inside? (Think of kiwi, coconut, pineapple, or edamame.) Broaden your egg conversation, and your meal, by including some of these foods as well.
  • Make a list of things that are important about you and each of your family members that others would know just by looking. Make a list of things that are important about you and each of your family members that others would not know just by looking. Which list is longer? Which list feels more important? What does this teach us about other people?

Keep discussing big ideas with your little ones. Check out our projects to get started!